Long DMV Lines are a Fixture in California’s Automotive License History

14 Aug
Long DMV Lines are a Fixture in California’s Automotive License History

Sparked by a recent hearing in California, a news story has called into question DMV wait times, especially in California. According to the DMV Director, Jean Shimoto DMV lines have only spiked in response to Real ID requirements. Yet, the eye-roll response and collective sigh could easily be heard across the country.

After all, everyone who has ever had to deal with the DMV knows the truth. DMV lines have always been long. Like getting a root canal, long lines at the DMV are an expected aggravation. When a person expresses having to go to the DMV, a long, aggravating wait is the prime collective thought.

However, California has an exceptional problem, that has stretched on for decades; much like the DMV line itself. Therefore, this new story, which basically printed an already known fact for most Californians, has inspired a call for change.

The response came in the form of a plan that few Californians knew was an option. Inspired by Nevada, California has started to place self-service kiosks throughout the state. Currently, the DMV has 60 kiosks throughout their various field offices and they plan to install ten more. A plan is also in place to install fifty more in grocery stores and other private outlets in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

These kiosks are capable of renewing registration and auto insurance instantly. These machines accept cash, check or card. Plus, having these kiosks in private areas, such as grocery stores, saves people a trip.

Unfortunately, only having a collection of a hundred kiosks placed throughout California is not going to fix the problem. More likely, it is going to aggravate people, considering the capability is available, but not set up in their area. This is like dangling the solution in front of weary people, desperate for change and then snatching it away. The current solution is nothing more than a tease.

If California wants to solve the problem, they are going to have to increase the proposed number of kiosks. Instead of one-hundred in total, there should be thousands placed all over the state. It will be interesting to see if the current instigation does anything to help ease the demand. Sadly, until such time, Californians are going to have to wait their turn, yet again.